Moms Organize 'Great Nurse-In' At U.S. Capitol | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Moms Organize 'Great Nurse-In' At U.S. Capitol

Play associated audio
 
Rachel Papantonakis with her 9-month old son, Ian. Papantonakis organized the "Great Nurse-In" being held at the Capitol this weekend.
 
Nilanjana Gupta
  Rachel Papantonakis with her 9-month old son, Ian. Papantonakis organized the "Great Nurse-In" being held at the Capitol this weekend.  

It isn't always easy for women in D.C. to breastfeed in public, even though it's legal. Now one D.C. mom is pushing for federal protection of breastfeeding everywhere with an unusual demonstration on Capitol Hill. 

Starting at 9 a.m. Saturday, moms will gather and nurse their babies en masse at the U.S. Capitol. 

Rachel Papantonakis of Northeast D.C., the organizer of the event, hasn't been criticized her for nursing her 9-month old son in public, but she knows it happens, she says.

"Recently there have been a number of news stories where women have been harassed for breastfeeding their children in public places and it bothered me," Papantonakis says.

In response, she organized the "Great Nurse-In" with the hope of raising support for a federal mandate protecting breastfeeding. The event features performances, activities and speeches by breastfeeding supporters. 

"The goal is to normalize breast feeding with a specific focus on public breastfeeding for today's society and also for future generations of parents," Papantonakis says. 

NPR

Mexican TV Icon Roberto Gómez Bolaños Dies At 85

The actor, writer and director was a staple of Mexican television comedies and children's programs for decades.
NPR

From Humble Salt To Fancy Freezing: How To Up Your Cocktail Game

You don't need to have liquid nitrogen at your next cocktail party — but it's certainly a sure-fire way to impress your guests. Expert mixologist Dave Arnold walks you through it.
NPR

Week In Politics: Hagel's Resignation, Ferguson Grand Jury Decision

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution and David Brooks of the New York Times about the grand jury's decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson and the resignation of Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel.
NPR

Millennial Doctors May Be More Tech-Savvy, But Is That Better?

Text messages from your doctor are just the start. Millennials are the next generation of doctors and they're not afraid to say "chillax" in a consultation or check Twitter to find medical research.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.