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Congress Heads Out Of Town Without Bailing Out Postal Service

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For the first time in its history, the U.S. Postal Service defaulted on retiree health care payments, and that has lawmakers in the region calling for action.

Before leaving town for August recess, Congress dealt with a lot of political bills that have no chance of becoming law. What the House didn't act on was legislation to help the Postal Service avoid defaulting on a more than $5 billion health care payment. 

With no congressional action, the Postal Service continues to lose about $1 billion each month. Rep. Jim Moran (D-Va.) is calling for lawmakers to address the crisis, because the options are only getting worse, he says. 

"By the time we're through this budget situation my guess is that things will look a lot differently," Moran says. "Particularly in the rural areas of the country, where the loss of Post Offices is almost unavoidable."

Lawmakers won't return to Washington until September, and there's still no timetable for a Postal reform bill in the House.

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