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D.C. May Get FEMA Funds For Derecho Cleanup

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Down trees and power outages were widespread in the D.C. area after the June 29 storm. 
Seth Liss
Down trees and power outages were widespread in the D.C. area after the June 29 storm. 

D.C. may be getting some help paying for the cleanup after the violent "derecho" storm that struck the region earlier this summer. President Obama on Tuesday retroactively declared D.C. a disaster zone after the storm. D.C. Mayor Gray had requested the designation. 

"The assistance will help us recoup some of the millions of dollars of expenses the city incurred in ensuring that our streets were safe and our residents had food, water and shelter after the storms," Gray said in a statement. 

The city will now be able to apply for disaster recovery funds from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which can cover a portion of D.C.'s costs. 

The line of strong wind and thunderstorms that passed through the region June 29 left millions without power, including thousands of Pepco customers in the District. The District extended pool hours and opened cooling centers for several days in order to help people escape the extreme heat.

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