Poll: Pepco's Storm Recovery Fell Short | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Poll: Pepco's Storm Recovery Fell Short

Play associated audio
A power line dips down in Maryland after the June 29 storm that left millions without power in the mid-Atlantic region.
Armando Trull
A power line dips down in Maryland after the June 29 storm that left millions without power in the mid-Atlantic region.

Following the devastating derecho storm that struck the region in late June, there's been renewed talk of burying power lines to reduce the risk of outages during storms. But support for that idea drops when the cost estimates come up, according to a new poll from the Washington Post

The Post's poll found that a majority of D.C. residents rated Pepco's power restoration efforts during June's storm as unsatisfactory. But there was little support to pay for a widely debated plan to bury power lines throughout the city, an endeavor that could cost anywhere from $1.5 billion to $6 billion. 

One-third of the D.C. residents polled don't want to pay for the undergrounding at all. The other two-thirds said they might stomach an increase of between $2 and $20 per month, but at these rates, it would take nearly 30 years and cover less than one-third of the total cost. 

To fully pay for the burial of the power lines, a typical Pepco bill would need to go up by $100 a month over the next 30 years, according to company estimates from 2010. 

NPR

Buzz Bissinger: With Caitlyn Jenner, 'You Feel A Connection'

NPR's Melissa Block interviews Buzz Bissinger about his profile of Caitlyn Jenner in Vanity Fair and her gender transition. She is formerly known as Bruce, an Olympic gold medalist in the decathlon.
NPR

Grass Gourmands: A Herbivore Food Mystery On The African Savanna

A new study sheds light on a longstanding ecological question: How do so many species like impalas and elephants co-exist when they're all feeding on the same limited foods?
NPR

House Panel Questions Air Bag Manufacturer About Chemical Explosive It Uses

Lawmakers wanted to know more about the recall of some 34 million vehicles that have potentially defective air bags made by the Takata Corporation. Congress wants to know what caused the problem.
NPR

Experts Debate: Will Computers Edge People Out Of Entire Careers?

Machines have been taking jobs forever. Computers and software are doing things people were paid to do. They are booking airplane flights. Filing our taxes. And they are getting better all the time.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.