House Republicans Try To Cut 'Red Tape' In New Bill | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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House Republicans Try To Cut 'Red Tape' In New Bill

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Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.) is leading an effort this week to undo what he says is unnecessary "red tape" forced on businesses by the government. 

Republicans not only want to shrink the size of the government, but also its role in everyday life. This week they're taking aim at government regulations with a bill called the Red Tape Reduction and Small Business Job Creation Act.

Their legislation attempts to stop President Obama from implementing more regulations until the unemployment rate is under 6 percent. Cantor says rules and regulations, whether they deal with clean air or workplace safety, are crushing job growth in the U.S.  

"We hear over and over again that it is just too difficult to start up a business," Cantor says. "We know that over the last three years there's been a 23 percent decline in new business startups in America." 

Cantor, who is the House majority leader, is leading the effort for his party which will continue to paint a stark contrast between the two parties before lawmakers leave town in August. 

Critics say Cantor's  bill hurts efforts to combat pollution and also puts large corporations above average consumers. 

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