D.C. Agencies Get Mostly 'C' And 'B' Grades In Pilot Program | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Agencies Get Mostly 'C' And 'B' Grades In Pilot Program

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D.C. government agencies are getting average grades at best under a pilot program that allows residents to evaluate their performances.

The first batch of results from a pilot program called Grade.DC.Gov are in. The program develops the agency grades by taking comments from online surveys, social media and popular blogs.

Five departments were evaluated in June, and none got a grade better than C-plus. The Department of Motor Vehicles fared worst, with a C-minus grade. Some agencies improved their grades through mid-July, with the Department of Public Works going from C-plus to a B.

The D.C.-based company New Brand Analytics, which was tapped by the city to do the evaluations, has been looking at those shifts.

"The trend of the data is most important and so we are very important to see that grades have improved," says Zack Boisi, who works with the firm.

The District is the first city government in the country to implement such a grading system, according to Mayor Vincent Gray. Ten more agencies will be added to the program this fall.

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