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O'Malley Meets With Baltimore Lawmakers On Gambling

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Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley (D) and State House Speaker Michael Busch (D) are trying to allay Baltimore lawmakers' concerns that a casino in Prince George's County could hurt a planned casino in Baltimore.

O'Malley, Busch and Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake met with about half of the city's 18-member House delegation at City Hall for about 90 minutes behind closed doors on Wednesday, according to the Associated Press.

The plan they hashed out calls for putting some gambling revenue aside for Baltimore and Anne Arundel County — where the Maryland Live! casino opened last month, Busch told reporters afterward. He says the idea is to hold "Charm City" and the county from suffering revenue lost to another casino. 

O'Malley wants to call a special session to take up gambling expansion if a consensus can be reached. Lawmakers would take up allowing table games and a Prince George's casino. But competing interests have not yet been able to reach a consensus; a potential special session scheduled for earlier this summer did not go forward as a result.

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