Metro's Heat-Related Speed Restrictions Suspended | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Metro's Heat-Related Speed Restrictions Suspended

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Metro trains were forced to stay below speeds of 35 mph all weekend to avoid any complciations of the extreme heat that plagued the region. 
Mylon Medley
Metro trains were forced to stay below speeds of 35 mph all weekend to avoid any complciations of the extreme heat that plagued the region. 

While wet pavement has been making things tougher for drivers this morning, last night's  rain is actually making the commute speedier for Metro riders in the District. 

The cold front that swept in last night — amid booming thunderstorms — and brought much needed rain and much neded relief from the heat also allowed Metro to end all of its heat-related restrictions on all of its lines. This morning all Metrorail trains are operating at normal speeds. WMATA had enforced the speed restrictions after a Green line train derailed Friday due to a heat related track problem. 

No one was hurt in the derailment, which occurred just before 5 p.m. Friday. Green line trains traveling between West Hyattsville and Prince George's Plaza are also now operating normally. The heat was so intense Friday that it buckled a 1,000-foot segment of rail that has been replaced. 

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