WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Ocean City Locals Hunker Down As Summer Arrives

Play associated audio
Tourists will crowd into Ocean City, Md. and surrounding resorts this weekend and for the rest of the summer.
Ben Beard (http://www.flickr.com/photos/benjaminbeard/3827428339/)
Tourists will crowd into Ocean City, Md. and surrounding resorts this weekend and for the rest of the summer.

Hundreds of thousands of people spent the Fourth of July at the beach in Ocean City, and while many will make it a long weekend soaking up the sun and playing in the ocean, others are seeking shelter from the heat, and the crowds.

The Fourth is one of the busiest weekends of the year in the resort city. Businesses know a good weather forecast is vital to maximizing profits and tourists want as much time as possible lounging on the beach and watching fireworks. But for many locals, the Fourth of July is no holiday.

"They stay away from the traffic or the crowds and that type of thing," says Lorraine Mack, who's lived in the area for 17 years. "Or they are working so they don't have a choice of where they are going to spend it." Like so many locals, Mack tends to steer clear of the 10-mile-long island that's packed this week.

Some tourists try to stay away from the crowds too. New Jersey native Steve Shaldone, who's staying at a local campground just outside Ocean City. His strategy? Remain at the campground at all costs. 

"It's self sufficient and we don't have to leave at all," Shaldone says. 

While there is inevitably mixed feeling among locals about traffic backups leading into the resort this time of year, the Fourth of July means that summer is officially here, and it's time to either get to work or seek shelter until the fall.

NPR

A Glimpse Of Listeners' #NPRpoetry — From The Punny To The Profound

It was a simple idea: Would you, our listeners, tweet us poems for National Poetry Month? Your response contained multitudes — haiku, lyrics, even one 8-year-old's ode to her dad's bald spot.
NPR

When It Came To Food, Neanderthals Weren't Exactly Picky Eaters

During the Ice Age, it seems Neanderthals tended to chow down on whatever was most readily available. Early humans, on the other hand, maintained a consistent diet regardless of environmental changes.
NPR

10 Years After Immigration Protests, What Has Changed?

Jose Antonio Vargas of Define American, Fermin Vasquez of the SEIU and Jessica Vaughan of the Center for Immigration Studies discuss the legacy of 10 years of activism for immigration reform.
NPR

Apple's Lousy Week Could Signal Times Of Trouble For Tech Giant

Apple got hit with a lot of bad news this week. First, the company posted its first quarterly revenue drop since 2003. And then billionaire activist investor Carl Icahn revealed that he has dumped all of his shares in Apple. NPR explores whether the company is really in trouble or if is this all just a bump in the road.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.