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Power Restored At Washington Animal Rescue League

Pets tried to beat the heat during shelter's outage

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A dog gets a cooling shower during the power outage at the Washington Animal Rescue League.
Courtesy of Washington Animal Rescue League
A dog gets a cooling shower during the power outage at the Washington Animal Rescue League.

When the power went out last Friday, there were about 180 cats and dogs at the Washington Animal Rescue League. The staff immediately mobilized, coming in to help keep the pets cool, walk them, and get them ice, says Maureen Sosa, director of the shelter. 

"Everyone came in and kind of jumped on board," Sosa says. They quickly put a call out to the community; the shelter needed ice, generators and gasoline. 

"They community has been amazing," Sosa says. "They've been coming in groups dropping off ice, gasoline, cash donations." 

Power went back on Tuesday afternoon, but before it did, the dogs were enjoying periodic hose-downs with cool water to help keep them from overheating. Many foster families also took in of the neediest-case animals into their homes as part of the emergency foster program.

The shelter thanked everyone who donated via Facebook Wednesday morning, saying that all the towels and fans delivered will help them be more prepared for the next emergency.

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