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July Fourth Means Busy Day Of Parades For Politicians

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While most people will spend today's holiday relaxing with friends and family the region's politicians are using it for a little good old fashion politicking.

Where there's Fourth of July, there are parades, and where there are parades, there are politicians. Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-Va.) says the holiday is a great time to get out and shake some hands.

"The Fourth of July for me is the single busiest day of the year," he says. 

Rep. Rob Wittman (R-Va.) says he'll be busy throughout the week. 

"You know things are kind of spread out this week, you have 4th of July in the middle of the week," he says. "So we have some parades - at the end of the week we'll have one on July 7. I have another big event, our Old Timers Softball Game, which is a regional game, is this Saturday. So we'll do a variety of those things."

Now that the Supreme Court upheld the health care law, many lawmakers are preparing for some boisterous debate about the topic. But Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) says he doesn't expect to only hear from opponents.

"I think we'll hear from both sides," Scott says. "We'll hear from a lot of people."


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