WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Students At GMU Summer Camp Get Sick, 14 Hospitalized

Play associated audio

More than three dozen students attending a college prep summer camp at George Mason University in Fairfax have fallen ill and health department authorities are working to determine the cause, according to a GMU spokesperson.

A total of 40 out of 80 students have been affected by what is being called a likely viral outbreak, with 14 of them now in the hospital, says George Mason University Dan Walsch. Initially, food poisoning was suspected, but the Fairfax County Health Department now says the the students — who range in age from 15-22 — likely contracted viral gastroenteritis, which causes vomiting and diarrhea. The disease is sometimes referred to as "stomach flu'' even though it is not caused by influenza viruses. Germs like norovirus and rotavirus can sometimes be responsible for outbreaks of gastroenteritis.

Earlier this morning, the students began complaining of stomach pain and nausea after returning from a Washington Nationals game last night. They were then hospitalized as a precaution. The students who range in age from 15 to 22 were part of a summer camp for a college preparatory course.

The students are visiting GMU and the Washington D.C. area and have been staying in dormitories on GMU's campus.


No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

As the 60th anniversary of the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott approaches, author Jeanne Theoharis says it's time to let go of the image of Rosa Parks as an unassuming accidental activist.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.
WAMU 88.5

World Leaders Meet For The UN Climate Change Summit In Paris

World leaders meet for the UN climate change summit in Paris to discuss plans for reducing carbon emissions. What's at stake for the talks, and prospects for a major agreement.


What Is Li-Fi And When Will You Use It To Download Everything Faster?

Li-Fi is a lot like Wi-Fi, but it uses light to transmit data. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to the man who invented the faster alternative: Harald Haas.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.