Heat Wave Sweeps Into D.C., Prompting Health Advisories | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Heat Wave Sweeps Into D.C., Prompting Health Advisories

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Kids try to keep cool during a heat wave in the summer of 2011. 
Armando Trull
Kids try to keep cool during a heat wave in the summer of 2011. 

An early summer heat wave is sweeping through the mid-Atlantic region, and temperatures are expected to reach the upper 90s and feel like more than 100 degrees today. 

A heat advisory is in effect throughout the region starting at noon today and lasting through 10 p.m. Health officials are urging people to stay hydrated and remain out of the sun and indoors if possible. 

By 10 a.m., the temperature at Dulles International Airport was 85 degrees today. At 11 a.m., DC Alerts reported the temperature was 91 degrees and the heat index 96 degrees. A hyperthermia alert is in effect and cooling centers are open throughout D.C. Metro has made an exception to its "no food or drink" rule for passengers drinking water. 

City officials urge residents not to open fire hydrants on their own as a method of cooling off due to the possible dangerous drops in water pressure that could occur. 

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