Fort McHenry Hosts 'Sailabration' For War Of 1812 Bicentennial | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Fort McHenry Hosts 'Sailabration' For War Of 1812 Bicentennial

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Park ranger Vince Vaise at the Fort McHenry cannon emplacement in Baltimore. The fort will mark the start of the war of 1812 this weekend with a "Sailabration."
Armando Trull
Park ranger Vince Vaise at the Fort McHenry cannon emplacement in Baltimore. The fort will mark the start of the war of 1812 this weekend with a "Sailabration."

Baltimore's Fort McHenry will be commemorating 200 years since the War of 1812 this weekend with a "Star-Spangled Salabration" in and around the fort and surrounding harbor. 

Tall ships and U.S. Navy grey hulls will fill the harbor, and an air show from the U.S. Air Force "Blue Angels" will take place over are Saturday and Sunday. U.S., United Kingdom and Canadian officials will join National Park Service historians to affirm 200 years of peace since the war. 

"It's all about sailabration, about the commemoration of the start of the war of 1812, the bicentennial," says Vincent Vaise, chief of interpretation at the Fort McHenry national monument. 

The ships will then leave the harbor in grand procession June 19. 

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