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Maryland's DREAM Act Cleared For Referendum By Appeals Court

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Maryland's law to provide in-state college tuition to illegal immigrants living in the state will go to the voters for a referendum in November. The Maryland Court of Appeals affirmed the earlier judgment of the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court that the law is subject to a referendum.

Attorneys for an immigrant advocacy group tried to convince Maryland's highest court that a new law to provide in-state college tuition to illegal immigrants didn't belong on the ballot in November, according to the Associated Press. 

Opponents of the law, which was passed by the Maryland legislature during the 2011 session, have organized a petition drive to put the question before voters. But a lawyer for Casa de Maryland argued at the Maryland Court of Appeals yesterday that the law, called Maryland's DREAM Act after a piece of similar federal legislation, is a spending bill, and therefore cannot legally be subject to a referendum. 

A lawyer representing the group that led the petition drive argued the law has nothing to do with spending and should be allowed on the ballot. The proposed referendum question must be certified by August 30th.

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