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Incumbents Emerge Victorious In Alexandria Primary

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Some opponents of the Alexandria City Council's recent decisions were hoping for a shakeup at city hall to come out of yesterday's primary, but they were mostly disappointed. 
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Some opponents of the Alexandria City Council's recent decisions were hoping for a shakeup at city hall to come out of yesterday's primary, but they were mostly disappointed. 

Some incumbents and some former incumbents have won in the rare competitive Democratic primary for Alexandria City Council.

The status quo won big time, as incumbents Del Pepper and Paul Smedberg and former incumbents Tim Lovain and Justin Wilson both received nods from voters. First-time candidates Allison Silberberg and John Chapman also won spots on the ticket. 

Democrats in the city had split into factions in recent weeks leading up to the primary, with some opponents of the waterfront redevelopment plan and other development proposals throwing support behind a swath of new blood for the city council. 

But those forces of opposition weren't enough to carry the day. 

"I had a positive message about how to deal with development pressures, and I think people appreciated that," Lovain said. 

"This anti-development attitude, I don't think was really that loud and strong," said Alexandria Mayor Bill Euille after the votes were tallied. "But yet, I think people are pleased with direction of the city simply because our quality of life, and we are doing all the right things and will continue to do all the right things."

Longtime Democratic activist Dick Hobson said the race was one for the books.

"This campaign is like none other than we have ever had before in Alexandria to my knowledge because there was a reaction against incumbents, which apparently did not prevail," Hobson.

Katy Cannady was one of the many voters who opposed the waterfront plan and several other recent decisions of the Alexandria City Council. For the most part, her slate of candidates lost yesterday.

"Very disappointing results. I'm very sorry about the low turnout," Cannady said. "It seems that actual voters are satisfied with the status quo." 

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