Driver In Office Building Crash Charged With Arson | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Driver In Office Building Crash Charged With Arson

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The driver of a stolen vehicle that drove into a downtown D.C. office building late Friday night has been charged with arson, along with other counts, according to the Associated Press. The Metropolitan Police Department released more disturbing details of the accident Sunday. 

When police arrived on the scene of that wreck Friday, they found the driver was apparently trying to use a cigarette lighter next to a can of gasoline, investigators say. 

Arresting officers took that lighter away from the driver, 32-year-old Charles Ball of New Market, Md., according to court records. A gasoline container was also found in the vehicle, and the front seat was wet with what smelled like gasoline. 

Court records also show the car's owner had a restraining order filed against Ball the same day. 

Ball has been charged with arson and other counts for the weekend incident. Authorities say they believe he  intentionally crashed into the building, which is less than a mile from the White House in the city's business district.

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