Maryland Same-Sex Marriage Opponents Submit Huge Petition | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Maryland Same-Sex Marriage Opponents Submit Huge Petition

More than 100K signatures collected to put measure on ballot

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Maryland same-sex marriage opponents at a rally in April. Groups opposing the new law collected more than 100,000 signatures calling for the measure to be put on the ballot in November.
Elliott Francis
Maryland same-sex marriage opponents at a rally in April. Groups opposing the new law collected more than 100,000 signatures calling for the measure to be put on the ballot in November.

Opponents of Maryland's same-sex marriage law have delivered more than twice the number of signatures needed to force a referendum on the measure, according to the Associated Press.

Activists submitted 113,000 signatures on petitions yesterday, according to their tally, which is double the 55,736 required to put the issue on the ballot for Maryland voters in November. The state has 20 days to verify signatures. 

The new law legalizing same-sex marriage does not go into effect until January, leaving time for the referendum allowing voters to decide.  

Opponents were required to submit more than 18,000 signatures this week and had until June 30 to submit the remainder, although the later deadline won't be necessary since the groups have already far exceeded the quota of signatures needed. 

The Maryland Marriage Alliance spent $100,000 collecting signatures, Derek McCoy, the group's executive director, tells AP.  

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