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Court Rules For Van Hollen In Campaign Finance Disclosure Case

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Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) is proving successful at challenging the Federal Election Commission's disclosure policies for big donors.

The public may soon get a little more information about those nasty political ads you see leading up to Election Day. Van Hollen has won two court cases challenging the FEC regulations that allow donors to hide their political contributions from the public. A final ruling isn't expected for a few months, but Van Hollen says his recent appeals court victory is an important one. 

"This should be a wakeup call to the FEC that they need to start doing their job," Van Hollen says. "What the court found was not only did they not do their job but they failed to follow the law and illegally narrowed the required scope of disclosure. In other words, the way the FEC wrote the regulations, it's easier for people to hide their contributions to political advertising."

More than $80 million was dropped on outside spending in the 2010 midterm elections, but due to what critics call "lax disclosure requirements," no one will ever know where a lot of that money came from. 

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