WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Virginia Republican Wants To Tie Congress's Pay To Its Effectiveness

Play associated audio
 
Rep. Scott Rigell (R-Va.) addresses reporters outside the Capitol with other members of the Fix Congress Now Caucus. 
 
Matt Laslo
  Rep. Scott Rigell (R-Va.) addresses reporters outside the Capitol with other members of the Fix Congress Now Caucus.   

Rep. Scott Rigell (R-Va.) is teaming up with some of his Democratic colleagues to try to reform Congress. 

Partisan bickering has kept the two parties from agreeing to a budget for the past three years. Rigell wants to change that by tying lawmakers' salaries to their ability to pass a budget. The "No Budget, No Pay Act" would cut off lawmakers' salaries if they can't agree to a budget by Oct. 1 of each year. 

Speaking in front of the Capitol this week, Rigell bemoaned the gridlock in  D.C.

"This beautiful institution behind us is truly dysfunctional," Rigell said. "Though it has the appearance of beauty on the outside, inside it s not working." 

Rigell and a bipartisan group of nine of his colleagues have formed the  Fix Congress Now Caucus. In addition to trying to get a budget passed annually, the group is attempting to bring more comity to Washington, he says.

"We do need to kind of … slug it out, in the best sense of the phrase," Rigell said. "But we do that in a respectful, civil way, and that is not the case here so often. And we want to change that." 

Rigell seems to have an uphill battle convincing the rest of his state's delegation to tie their salaries to their performance though; so far, the only other Virginian to sign onto the effort is Rep. Robert Hurt R. 

NPR

The Glimmering Sheen Of A Wide World Seen From Inside A Bubble

The teen heroine of Nicola Yoon's debut novel, Everything, Everything, has a disorder that bars her from leaving her house. Still, her world is vast, filled with writings, drawings — and new love.
NPR

Correction: Italians And Celiac Disease

A correction to our story about gluten-free options in Italy, the land of pizza and pasta. Italian children are not routinely tested for celiac disease, as we incorrectly reported.
WAMU 88.5

America's Tolerance For Gun Violence

There are more gun-related deaths in America than in any other industrialized nation. We discuss what makes the U.S. different and why some hold out hope that change is possible.

NPR

China Arrests Nearly 200 Over 'Online Rumors'

The rumors ranged from a man leaping to his death in Beijing over stock losses to highly inflated death tolls in the Tianjin industrial blasts.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.