Virginia Delegate Looks To Bring Up GPS Tracking Bill Again | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Virginia Delegate Looks To Bring Up GPS Tracking Bill Again

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Concerns over privacy rights are driving one lawmaker in Virginia. After two unsuccessful efforts in the past, Del. Joe May ® is trying once again to place limitations on who legally can use electronic devices to track someone else. 

May's bill was sent back to committee after it sparked debate this legislative session. It restricted tracking a person without a warrant, and this year, would have granted law enforcement agencies exception. But private investigators protested and said it limited their ability to do their job. 

So May and the Joint Commission on Technology and Science are now revising it, although he says not much will change. 

We have a reduced to a page or a page and a half," he said. "Some of the other states that have tried it have ended up with pages and pages and pages of exceptions and exclusions and carve-outs 'til they're virtually impossible to interpret. Ours is very clean." 

May says technology is evolving so quickly that it's hard to draft legislation that addresses every exception. May sponsored the bill after a constituent complained that his ex-wife had paid a private investigator to track his whereabouts after the two had divorced. 

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