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Metro Investigating Rail Cars After Doors Opened While Trains Moved

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The doors opened on two of Metro's Red line trains while the trains were moving May 15. 
The doors opened on two of Metro's Red line trains while the trains were moving May 15. 

Metro Transit officials are investigating reports that doors on two Metrorail cars opened while the train was moving.

Passengers on Metro's Red line are keeping their fingers crossed, hoping the doors won't suddenly open on their moving trains this morning. That's exactly what happened yesterday on two packed Red line trains as they moved between the Van Ness and Tenleytown stations around 9 a.m. 

No one was injured, but Metro has taken those two trains out of service and is trying to determine why those doors failed. Metro spokesman Dan Stessel told the Washington Post that the door malfunctions are "extremely, extremely rare." 

Both of the cars were 1,000 series models -- the same ones involved in the 2009 Red line crash that killed nine and injured many more. They the oldest rains in Metro's fleet and they make up a quarter of metro's train contingent. 


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