WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Metro Investigating Rail Cars After Doors Opened While Trains Moved

Play associated audio
The doors opened on two of Metro's Red line trains while the trains were moving May 15. 
The doors opened on two of Metro's Red line trains while the trains were moving May 15. 

Metro Transit officials are investigating reports that doors on two Metrorail cars opened while the train was moving.

Passengers on Metro's Red line are keeping their fingers crossed, hoping the doors won't suddenly open on their moving trains this morning. That's exactly what happened yesterday on two packed Red line trains as they moved between the Van Ness and Tenleytown stations around 9 a.m. 

No one was injured, but Metro has taken those two trains out of service and is trying to determine why those doors failed. Metro spokesman Dan Stessel told the Washington Post that the door malfunctions are "extremely, extremely rare." 

Both of the cars were 1,000 series models -- the same ones involved in the 2009 Red line crash that killed nine and injured many more. They the oldest rains in Metro's fleet and they make up a quarter of metro's train contingent. 


In 'Fire At Sea,' Glimpse The Migrant Crisis From The Heart Of Mediterranean

Filmmaker Gianfranco Rosi talks about his documentary Fire at Sea. The film tells the story of the ongoing migrant crisis as experienced by residents of Lampedusa, an island off the coast of Sicily.

A History Of Election Cake And Why Bakers Want To #MakeAmericaCakeAgain

Bakers Susannah Gebhart and Maia Surdam are reviving election cake: a boozy, dense fruitcake that was a way for women to participate in the democratic process before they had the right to vote.

A Civil War History Lesson On Trump's Visit To Gettysburg

Trump visited the site of Pickett's Charge, a failed Confederate assault on the last day of the Battle of Gettysburg.

The Next Generation Of Local, Low-Power FM Stations Expands In Urban Areas

The next wave of low power FM stations is coming on the air. Initially restricted to rural areas because of interference concerns, nearly 2,000 new stations have been approved — many in urban areas.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.