WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Virginia Launching Program For At-Risk Mothers

Play associated audio

The state of Virginia has been awarded a federal grant to expand a home visitation program for at-risk families called the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting project.

State officials estimate that thousands of families need the services. Project Manager Linda Foster says a number of indicators help identify at-risk communities.

"Anything from low birth weight, infant mortality, to child abuse and neglect data, substance use, domestic violence," Foster says. "It's a variety of data."

The visits by nurses and others begin during pregnancy to promote healthy nutrition and behavior. Foster says success can be measured by how many newborns subsequently do not need intensive care. Visits continue through early childhood.

"Through solid, long-term research, we know that home visiting develops strong relationships between parents and children, safer and more stimulating home environments for children, child well-being and family self-sufficiency, and that this program really makes a difference in the lives of children and their parents," Foster says. "And it helps to insure that the child enters school healthy and ready to learn."

The program mentors parents, who then help their children to change unhealthy, multi-generational habits, Foster says.


'Not Without My Daughter' Subject Grows Up, Tells Her Own Story

"Not Without My Daughter" told the story of an American mother and daughter fleeing Iran. Now that young girl is telling her own story in her memoir, "My Name is Mahtob."

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.

Proposed Climate Change Rules At Odds With U.S. Opponents

President Obama says the U.S. must lead the charge to reduce burning of fossil fuels. But American lawmakers are divided on limiting carbon emissions and opponents say they'll challenge any new rules.

Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.