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Thomas Jefferson High Named #2 Best School In U.S.

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Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Alexandria is among the top five ranked "best" high schools in the country, according to an annual report.

U.S. News and World Report rates nearly 22,000 public high schools in 49 states and the District of Columbia based on state proficiency standards, how well they prepare students for college, and other factors.

Thomas Jefferson, part of the Fairfax County Public School system, came in at number two on the list in this year's ranking. The school's 13 specialized research labs, ranging from astrophysics to microelectronics to oceanography, contributed to its ranking, the report notes.

Four other Fairfax County schools made it in to the top 100: George C. Marshall high school in Falls Church, and McLean High School, James W. Robinson Junior Secondary and Langley High in McLean. George Mason High School, part of Falls Church City Public Schools, also made the list.

In Maryland, three Montgomery County schools made the top 100 list: Winston Churchill in Potomac, Walt Whitman in Bethesda and Thomas S. Wootton in Rockville.


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