Economic Picture Improves For Blacks In Virginia, Report Finds | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Economic Picture Improves For Blacks In Virginia, Report Finds

Play associated audio

African-Americans in Virginia are making economic progress, but a gap persists in their levels of employment and earnings, a new study shows. 

Michelle Claibourn, who studies population trends at the Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, took a close look at census data for more than 50,000 Virginians. Despite a history of discrimination against African Americans in the state, she found more of them were getting college degrees -- but economic disparities persist

"Black adult Virginians with a college degree who work full time had a median income of $50,000," she says. "White Virginians with a college degree who work full time had a median income of $60,000, so a $10,000 gap, which is about a 17 percent difference."

In addition, a larger percentage of African-Americans in Virginia are out of work, she says. 

"While unemployment for whites with a high school degree in 2010 was 15 percent, for blacks it was 22 percent," she says. "And you see those kinds of disparities across educational levels." Claibourn noted 20 percent of African Americans in Virginia had a college degree, compared to 37 percent of whites — so although college attendance numbers among blacks are improving, the state's legacy of discrimination has had lasting impacts.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Sept. 17

Art is what you make of it. You can chew, crunch and dance at a bacon-inspired festival or see how a local artist transformed old objects into responsive sculptures.

NPR

Edible Packaging? Retailers Not Quite Ready To Ditch The Wrapper

To reduce waste, some enterprising companies are trying to roll out products that make the package part of the snack — edible packaging. But selling it to the retail market is trickier than it seems.
NPR

House Could Vote On $500 Million To Arm, Train Syrian Rebels

The possible vote to authorize the Obama administration's plan to arm and train moderate fighters comes as the president meets with military officials at U.S. Central Command.
NPR

When The Power's Out, Solar Panels May Not Keep The Lights On

With the price of solar panels falling, more municipalities and homeowners are installing them. But having solar panels doesn't mean you won't lose power in a blackout — at least not yet.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.