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Police Seeking Suspect In Northwest Branch Trail Assaults

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Police have papered the Northwest Branch Trail with signs seeking information on the suspect in connection with several sexual assaults along the trail in recent months.
Armando Trull
Police have papered the Northwest Branch Trail with signs seeking information on the suspect in connection with several sexual assaults along the trail in recent months.

Authorities are warning those who use the Northwest Branch hiking and biking trail near the West Hyattsville Metro station about a rash of assaults in that area in recent months.

This section of the Northwest Branch Trail serves as a shortcut to the West Hyattsville station, and it has also become the scene of five sexual assaults since January. The latest attack happened April 20 around 5 p.m,  Maryland National Capital Park Police tell NBC Washington.

In that incident, a woman was enjoying the trail when she was approached by a man with a gun. The man forced her into the wooded areas alongside the trail and then sexually assaulted her. 

The suspect's description matches that of victims in all five attacks, described as a hispanic male between 5/55/7 and heavyset, police have plastered the area with posters with the suspect's description, got an LED sign with a phone number, telling folks to report any s uspicious activity alongside the trail. 

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