NASCAR Debuts Electric Pace Car In Richmond | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

NASCAR Debuts Electric Pace Car In Richmond

Play associated audio

Virginia leaders are using this weekend's NASCAR race in Richmond to promote environmental stewardship.

Millions will witness the first-ever fully electric pace car in a NASCAR race. Lt. Governor Bill Bolling ® helped unveil two vehicles at the State Capitol just before delivering them to the Richmond International Raceway. 

A NASCAR official says the electric Ford Focus, priced at nearly $40,000, meets all the rigorous specs of other pace cars, but its fuel efficiency is the equivalent of 110 miles per gallon. While the cross-promotion adds to the already successful race which brings millions in revenue to the state it signals new technology and savings.

"You know one of the reasons that we're trying to move in state government to have more environmentally-conscious requirements in construction of buildings and conversion in our own state fleet is in large part, those two things," Bolling says. "It saves money on fuel but there is also an environmental consciousness that is a part of it that is important."

The vehicle does not appear to be ready for broad consumer purchase. A Ford spokesperson says the cars are primarily commercial vehicles. 

NPR

Book Review: 'Angels Make Their Hope Here'

Alan Cheuse reviews Angels Make Their Hope Here, by Breena Clarke.
NPR

Glass Or No Glass? That Is The Grill Lid Question

Would you be a better cook if you could see your food on the grill without lifting the lid? We take a peek under the hood of an innovative glass-top grill that claims to help prevent the dreaded burn.
NPR

On Immigration, America's Concerns Are Fiery But Fleeting

In a recent Gallup poll, most named immigration the biggest problem confronting the nation. But past periods of heightened worries have been brief — and haven't brought about solutions.
NPR

9/11 Commission Issues An Update On Anniversary Of Report

Saying that the world has changed "dramatically," the report's authors write that al-Qaida groups have spread, and the threat for cyberterrorism has grown.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.