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NASCAR Debuts Electric Pace Car In Richmond

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Virginia leaders are using this weekend's NASCAR race in Richmond to promote environmental stewardship.

Millions will witness the first-ever fully electric pace car in a NASCAR race. Lt. Governor Bill Bolling ® helped unveil two vehicles at the State Capitol just before delivering them to the Richmond International Raceway. 

A NASCAR official says the electric Ford Focus, priced at nearly $40,000, meets all the rigorous specs of other pace cars, but its fuel efficiency is the equivalent of 110 miles per gallon. While the cross-promotion adds to the already successful race which brings millions in revenue to the state it signals new technology and savings.

"You know one of the reasons that we're trying to move in state government to have more environmentally-conscious requirements in construction of buildings and conversion in our own state fleet is in large part, those two things," Bolling says. "It saves money on fuel but there is also an environmental consciousness that is a part of it that is important."

The vehicle does not appear to be ready for broad consumer purchase. A Ford spokesperson says the cars are primarily commercial vehicles. 


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