Project Veritas Attempts To Expose Voter Fraud In D.C. | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Project Veritas Attempts To Expose Voter Fraud In D.C.

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An investigation is underway in D.C. after an activist tried to vote in last week's primary using U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder's name, according to Associated Press. James O'Keefe of Project Veritas tells the AP it was an attempt to draw attention to voter fraud.

The elections board says that evidence of potential criminal activity from last week's city primary will be referred to law enforcement.

The investigation stems from undercover videos posted online by activist James O'Keefe's Project Veritas. The group also has made undercover videos targeting Medicaid, NPR and community organizing group ACORN.

In the latest video, an O'Keefe associate tries to vote as Holder. The city doesn't require IDs to vote, so the poll worker verifies the name spelling and address before offering a ballot. Then the activist insists on leaving to get an ID.

O'Keefe says his group did not misrepresent themselves.

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