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Civics Education Advocates Say Virginia Law Was Wrongly Repealed

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A Virginia General Assembly commission says it's now up to Gov. Bob McDonnell to fix a bill that repealed a state law based on mistaken information.

The state law required all elementary and middle school teachers and high school social science teachers to learn about Virginia and local governments. The Department of Education and Virginia Tech developed a free online course to meet the requirement. But a gubernatorial panel proposed repealing it for current teachers some time later, and Civics Commission member and former Del. Jim Dillard says that ruling was based on an error. 

"Unfortunately, one of the counties misunderstood this particular course, which is online at no cost to the localities or to the teachers," Dillard says. "They said to the [gubernatorial] Commission that it was going to cost $2,000 a teacher to take this course."

As a result, the governor's Commission on Unfunded Mandates included this course among bills that should be to be repealed.

To prevent the repeal, the commission has asked the Governor to amend the bill for the mid-April reconvened session in the assembly. 

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