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D.C. Voters May Stay Away From Primary After Year Of Scandals

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Mallory Noe-Payne

After a tumultuous year filled with scandals at D.C. city hall, federal investigations, and a former member pleading guilty to embezzling funds, D.C. voters head to the polls tomorrow.

More than a third of the D.C. Council is up for re-election this year, and the defining issue in many of the races: ethics. While this has lead to many spirited debates between council members and their opponent, it's unclear how all of the scandals and investigations at the Wilson building will affect turnout on Tuesday.

"This sort of story breaks before a primary you probably do see depressed turn-out because I think it reaffirms people's worse suspicions," says District resident Aaron Lovell.

But Liz Rose, another D.C. voter, says she thinks the allegations of government corruption will actually drive up the number of voters who cast a ballot tomorrow.

"I want candidates who are honest and trustworthy and take public service seriously and don't see it as a gravy train," she says.

Polls will open 7 a.m. and close at 8 p.m.

We learned about the subject of this story through WAMU's Public Insight Network. Learn more about the Public Insight Network.


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