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Poll: Voters Split Over Virginia Abortion Ultrasound Bill

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Virginia voters seem to be sharply divided on a new law requiring women to get ultrasounds before they have an abortion.
Jorge Rimblas: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rimblas/3425525660/
Virginia voters seem to be sharply divided on a new law requiring women to get ultrasounds before they have an abortion.

Voters in Virginia appear to be at odds with the state legislature and the governor over a new law that sets guidelines on ultrasounds and abortions, according to the results of the latest opinion poll from Quinnipiac University.

The poll finds that 52 percent of Virginia voters polled disagree with a new law that requires women seeking an abortion to undergo an ultrasound examination at least 24 hours before the procedure. 41 percent of those polled agreed with the law.

The gender breakdown is interesting. Among women polled, 49 percent disapproved of the new ultrasound/abortion law while 44 percent approved of it. Among men, 56 percent said they disapprove of the law, while 38 percent said they approve of it.  

Unsurprisingly, party affiliation shows a marked difference. More than 60 percent of Republicans polled approved of the law, while only 27 percent of Democrats said they approved. Among independent voters, and 56 percent said they approved, and 39 percent said they disapproved of the new law. 

More generally, 72 percent of those polled by Quinnipiac agreed that government should not make laws which try to convince women seeking an abortion to change their minds, while 21 percent believed government should make such laws. 

About 1,000 registered Virginia voters were surveyed, and the poll has a plus or minus 3.1 percent margin of error.

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