D.C. Council Wants A Closer Look At New Disabled Parking Program | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Council Wants A Closer Look At New Disabled Parking Program

City's new red-top meters won't go into effect for another 90 days

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The D.C. Council passed emergency legislation yesterday halting major changes to the way disabled drivers park cars in the city, according to Associated Press. The bill, sponsored by Council member Muriel Bowser, suspends enforcement of the city's new "red-top" parking meter program for 90 days.

The program would have required people with valid disability plates or placards to pay for parking at reserved meters around the city, which stand out due to their red-colored tops. The D.C. Department of Transportation has been installing the red-top meters around the city as part of the new program. About 400 of them have been placed so far, and a total of 1,500 are expected to be installed in all.

But at least for now, those drivers can continue to park for free after the council suspended implementation of the program, meaning D.C. drivers can safely park at red tio neters for the time being. Bowser told WAMU 88.5's Kojo Nnamdi Tuesday that she feels the program should be subject to a public hearing.

"It's a big change that amounts to a lot of moving parts and pieces, and I don't think the public has been adequately engaged on what that change means for their day to day life," she said.

D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray, who has said the red-top meter program would curb fraudulent use of disabled tags, must now file a report to the Council explaining the program more thoroughly. That report is due in 45 days. 

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