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After Audit, Alexandria School Board Stands Behind Superintendent

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Alexandria Superintendent Morton Sherman, standing, waits for School Board members to call an executive session to consider the division's response to a scathing auditor's report.
Michael Pope
Alexandria Superintendent Morton Sherman, standing, waits for School Board members to call an executive session to consider the division's response to a scathing auditor's report.

Members of the Alexandria School Board are standing by schools superintendent Morton Sherman, despite calls for him to step down in the wake of a scathing auditor's report. 

The announcement came after board members emerged from a three-hour, closed-door executive session Thursday night to express complete confidence in the performance of school Sherman. The school's chief executive has been under fire in recent days after an auditor's report blasted the school district for approving contracts that hadn't been budgeted and providing incorrect information to school board members. 

But those problems have been addressed, School Board Chair Sheryl Gorsuch said after the meeting.

"We are taking steps for additional accountability to make sure this doesn't happen again," she said. But that's not enough for Alexandria Vice Mayor Kerry Donley, who says that Sherman should resign.

"The buck stops at the top," Donley said.

The superintendent disagreed with Donley, saying he approached school board members as soon as he discovered the problems, acting swiftly to get rid of those responsible and to begin implementing changes to prevent it from happening again.

"Ultimately all of that is my responsibility, but you can't say that because you didn't know about it or you didn't do something about it that it's your fault," Sherman said. "So I think there’s a difference between responsibility and fault."

School board members said they regret what happened, but they are sure the superintendent acted responsibly.

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