WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Tame Primary Campaigns In Virginia Could Benefit GOP

Play associated audio
 
Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov., Mitt Romney addresses the Northern Virginia Technology Council in Reston, Va., Feb. 10.
(AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
  Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov., Mitt Romney addresses the Northern Virginia Technology Council in Reston, Va., Feb. 10.

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney won yesterday's Republican presidential primary in Virginia, but leading up to it, he and the others didn't spend a lot of cash in the state, sparing voters a multi-million dollar negative ad campaign.

That could help the GOP's nominee win the state in the general election, because many voters in competitive states report being soured by all the nasty ads Republican candidates have been lobbing at each other.

"Negative ads are generally designed to drive down your opponents' supporters," says Bill Allison of the watchdog group Sunlight Foundation.  

Ahead of yesterday's vote, Virginia was largely passed over by the GOP candidates because only former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Texas Rep. Ron Paul made the ballot. 

Restore Our Future, a political action committee known as a "super PAC,"  has run negative campaign ads against Romney's opponents in several key battleground states. Allison says if Romney wins the nomination, his campaign could benefit from Virginia being such a tame primary. 

"But in the sense of the fall and Virginia being a swing state, it may help Romney not to have had his super PAC run the scorched earth campaign that he's had to do in other states," Allison says. 

While Virginia voters were spared the negativity this time, Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-Va.) says the fall will be a different story.

"Virginia is going to be a competitive state at the presidential, senatorial, and congressional levels and therefore I think you're going to see a lot of resources and it is going to be a very, very robust contest," Connolly says.

Democrats also point out that none of the GOP candidates were forced to campaign too hard in Virginia, which they say gives them a leg up when it comes to the ground game that will be essential to win Virginia in the fall. 

NPR

Jack Davis, Cartoonist Who Helped Found 'Mad' Magazine, Dies

Money from a job illustrating a Coca-Cola training manual became a springboard for Jack Davis to move from Georgia to New York.
NPR

Cookie Dough Blues: How E. Coli Is Sneaking Into Our Forbidden Snack

Most people know not to eat raw cookie dough. But now it's serious: 46 people have now been sickened with E. coli-tainted flour. Here's how contamination might be occurring.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour – LIVE from Slim's Diner!

This special edition of the Politics Hour is coming to you live from Slim's Diner from Petworth in Northwest D.C.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.