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Virginia Tech Wrongful Death Lawsuit Goes To Court

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Two parents accusing Virginia Tech University of being responsible for their children's deaths in a 2007 shooting will get their day in cour starting today. 
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Two parents accusing Virginia Tech University of being responsible for their children's deaths in a 2007 shooting will get their day in cour starting today. 

A lawsuit brought by the parents of two students who died in the 2007 shooting rampage at Virginia Tech goes to trial in Christiansburg, Va. today, the Associated Press reports.

More than 50 witnesses are expected to testify in the trial, which is being held at the circuit court in Montgomery County, Va.  The list includes students who survived the shooting and Virginia Tech President Charles W. Steger.

Attorneys representing the parents of the two students will press university officials to defend their actions during the deadliest shooting spree in modern American history. A total of 33 people died, including the gunman.

The lawsuit originally sought $10 million for the wrongful deaths of the two students, but the damages are now capped at $100,000 for each of their parents. The state is the lone defendant in the case. 

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