Report: Child Poverty Down In D.C. | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Report: Child Poverty Down In D.C.

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A new study shows fewer children in D.C. are living in neighborhoods with high concentrations of poverty. But the District still holds a higher concentrated poverty rate than any state, and ranks 10th-worst among large U.S. cities. 

The new Kids Count report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation found that about 33,000 children in the District live in neighborhoods where at least 30 percent of residents are below the poverty line. 

That's an 11 percent drop from the 37,000 such children counted in 2000. But nearly one-third of children in the District still live in concentrated poverty. 

Jenny Reed of the D.C. Fiscal Policy Institute tells Washington Examiner that one of the reasons for the drop is higher-income people moving back into the city. 

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