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GPS Tracking Bill Fails In Virginia Senate Committee

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A Virginia Senate committee has rejected legislation that would have made it illegal to secretly use an electronic device to track someone. The bill had passed last week in the Virginia House of Delegates.

The Courts of Justice Committee voted 9-6 to kill the bill, which was sponsored by Del. Joe May (R . The Loudoun County representative introduced the legislation after a constituent complained that a private eye hired by his estranged wife had placed a GPS on his car, and it was legal to do so. 

The bill included several exemptions, including one for police and another for parents tracking their kids. Senators struggled with several issues, including whether the co-owner of a vehicle should be allowed to secretly track the other co-owner. 

May says he's disappointed the measure didn't pass, but says he'll re-introduce the legislation next year. 

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