D.C. Council Chair To Introduce Anti-Cursing Bill | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Council Chair To Introduce Anti-Cursing Bill

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Council members got into a shouting match that turned ugly during a recent council retreat. Now, the D.C.Council chairman is hoping to crack down on profanity during council proceedings.
Mallory Noe-Payne
Council members got into a shouting match that turned ugly during a recent council retreat. Now, the D.C.Council chairman is hoping to crack down on profanity during council proceedings.

While many legislative bodies set rules for swearing-in procedures, the D.C. council is taking steps to stop members from swearing at each other.

Following a handful of high-profile incidents involving council members hurling expletives and insults at each other, Council Chairman Kwame Brown is expected to introduce a bill today to put the kibosh on all that cursing.

The latest verbal dust-up happened during the council's Valentine's Day retreat when Council members Marion Barry and David Catania feuded over a hospital in Barry's home ward. After the incident, Catania acknowledged the two have a history of going at it.

"I've hit my level of frustration," Catania said. "He's sworn at me plenty of times, so for him to play Caesar's wife is hilarious."

According to the Washington Post, which first reported the proposal, Brown’s measure would update the D.C. government’s code of conduct to add that members are prohibited from using "profane, indecent or abusive language" during an open meeting.

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