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Same-Sex Marriage Heads To The Maryland Senate

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Although the Maryland General Assembly has moved one step closer to approving same-sex marriage for the state, the legislation's future still hangs in the balance.

Just 11 months ago, the General Assembly rejected a same-sex marriage proposal, but on Feb. 17, 72 lawmakers in the Maryland House approved the measure. It's now on its way to the Senate, which approved a same-sex marriage bill last year.

Even if the Senate passes it again, observers are anticipating the measure being sent directly to voters as a referendum on November's ballot. Many prominent African American leaders in the state oppose the measure and are rallying opposition to it. Voters in the state seem split over whether to approve same-sex marriage.

But if it passes all the remaining hurdles, Maryland would become the seventh state to approve same-sex marriage, in addition to the District of Columbia.

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