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Huguely Trial: Prosecution Wraps Up Case

Coroner testifies Yeardley Love suffered blunt force trauma

The prosecution has rested in the first-degree murder trial of former University of Virginia lacrosse player George Huguely V, according to Associated Press. Prosecutors called nearly 50 witnesses in their effort to make the case that Huguely killed his ex-girlfriend and fellow UVA student Yeardley Love in May of 2010. 

The coroner that performed the autopsy on Love testified yesterday that he concluded the 22-year-old Love died of cardiac arrhythmia caused by blunt force trauma. 

He also testified that Love did have alcohol and prescription drugs in her system when she died, but that neither were present in lethal amounts. Huguely's defense attorneys have argued that Love's death could have been caused by the prescription medicine Adderall, which she took for attention deficit disorder.

The prosecution also called to the stand Dr. Christine Fuller, a brain expert from the Virginia Commonwealth University who examined Love's brain after the autopsy was complete, NBC Washington reports

Fuller said she found injuries to Love's brain that would have been caused by blunt force trauma and by a "violent twisting."

Among the last to take the stand for the prosecution was Ken Clausen, a former teammate of the defendant on UVA's lacrosse team. Clausen testified that Huguely had been drinking heavily the night before Love was found slain, and had lied about his whereabouts the night of Love's murder.

He also testified that Huguely seemed to undergo a sudden mood shift after Love's body was found the next day, with a "bank stare" on his face.


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