Ehrlich Campaign Consultant Goes To Court On Robocalls | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Ehrlich Campaign Consultant Goes To Court On Robocalls

Julius Henson's lawyer argues law is unconstitutional

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An attorney for a Maryland political operative accused of using robocalls to suppress black voter turnout on election day 2010 says the statute regarding the calls is unconstitutional, according to Associated Press.

A judge in Baltimore heard motions Monday on the case of Julius Henson, a campaign consultant for former Republican Governor Bob Ehrlich. Motions will continue this morning. 

The calls told supporters of Democratic governor Martin O'Malley to relax because they had already won on Election Day two years ago. O'Malley and Ehrlich were facing each other for the second time in four years.

Henson has said he did not believe the calls were illegal and weren't meant to suppress the vote. His trial was postponed in November after a judge recused himself. 

Ehrlich aide Paul Schurick was tried separately in the same case and found guilty in December of all four counts he faced. 

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