WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Race For Ward 5 Council Seat Officially Begins

Play associated audio
Ward 5 council candidates will have to collect at least 500 signatures to be on the ballot.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jayw/562840963/
Ward 5 council candidates will have to collect at least 500 signatures to be on the ballot.

The race for the empty Ward 5 D.C. Council seat begins today, as candidates can begin circulating petitions to get on the May 14 ballot.Once the Elections Board opens its doors this morning, candidates will be able to pick up petitions and start gathering signatures.

The seat was vacated by former Council member Harry Thomas Jr., who pleaded guilty to stealing more than $350,000 in city funds earlier this month. Thomas' sentencing hearing is scheduled for early May, less than two weeks before the special election.

Several people have signaled an interest in running, and at least one person has already filed a declaration of candidacy with the city's board of elections. But today begins the first real test for council hopefuls, as they'll have to gather enough valid signatures to get on the ballot. In this case, they'll need the autographs of 500 Ward 5 residents.

And unlike the city's closed primary elections in April, the May 14 special election is open to all candidates and voters, regardless of party affiliation.

NPR

Woody Allen's 'Fading Gigolo' Full Of Loneliness And Longing

In the new comedy Fading Gigolo, John Turturro plays the title character, and Woody Allen plays his pimp. This story originally broadcast on All Things Considered on April 18, 2014.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.