WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Perry, Gingrich Ballot Battles Go To Court

Virginia's ballot qualification requirements are proving challenging for some of the GOP presidential candidates.
AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Virginia's ballot qualification requirements are proving challenging for some of the GOP presidential candidates.


A Northern Virginia attorney has filed a lawsuit to get Newt Gingrich's name on the state's Republican primary ballot. The state's board of elections ruled Dec. 24 that Gingrich had not submitted the required 10,000 signatures to get on the ballot. The suit comes just days after Texas Governor Rick Perry also sued to get his name on the ballot.

Attorney Jonathan Moseley of Reston says he filed the suit Thursday in the Circuit Court of Richmond County, according to the Associated Press. The suit claims that many of the signatures discounted in the review were improperly excluded, according to AP.

Texas Governor Rick Perry's signatures also came up short after the board's review, and the GOP presidential candidate filed suit in both Virginia state and federal courts this week. 

Perry had a setback Dec. 29, however, when the Virginia judge hearing the case set an initial hearing for Jan. 13. acording to NBC Washington. Primary ballots need to be printed by Jan. 9, however, according to Virginia law. 

Gingrich had been scrambling to gather signatures last week before the Dec. 22 deadline for filing. The suit filed by Moseley last week is separate from the Gingrich campaign; a spokesperson for the campaign tells AP that the candidate is still deciding how to proceed in the commonwealth.

Virginia has the most stringent ballot qualification laws in the country. The state's primary is scheduled for "Super Tuesday," March 6. So far, only Mitt Romney and Ron Paul are qualified to be on the ballot.



5 Sisters Struggle With The Shackles Of A Conservative Culture In 'Mustang'

Five Turkish teens are censured by a culture threatened by their burgeoning sexuality in Deniz Gamze Ergüven's debut film. Critic John Powers says Mustang brims with "the zing and energy of life."

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.

After Paris, Obama Administration Changes Visa Waiver Program

Holes in the visa program that allow easy entry into the United States are being re-examined. President Obama is taking steps to tighten the program, while Congress works on a fix.

Amazon Offers New Glimpse Of What Its Drone Delivery Could Look Like

The company says its Prime Air service will someday deliver packages up to five pounds in 30 minutes or less using small drones.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.