Virginia Luring Company That Launches Remains Into Space | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Virginia Luring Company That Launches Remains Into Space

Play associated audio

NASA's shuttle program is over but, in case you were worried, you can still launch your deceased loved ones into the void of space. 

The program, which is currently run out of New Mexico by a company called Celestis, encourages people to "honor the dream and memory of your departed loved one with a final journey into celestial infinity." 

Celestis sends samples of cremated remains into low earth orbit, deep space or to the moon. They don't launch out of Virginia's spaceport at Wallops Island now, but Virginia's Space Flight Authority would like to change that. 

That's one reason why the state's House of Delegates will consider a bill that would offer a $2,500 tax deduction for Virginians who launch their loved ones out of Virginia. 

"What it does for the Eastern Shore economy is provide another launch opportunity for space workers but in addition it provides opportunities for virginia's lodging and travel industry who will be celebrating their loved one going to fulfill their dream of going into space," says Jack Kennedy, with the Virginia Commercial Space Flight Authority.

The price for the service ranges from $1000 to $13,000, Kennedy thinks it could be available in Virginia within the next two years.

NPR

100 Years Ago, 'New Republic' Helped Define Modern Liberalism

Robert Siegel speaks with The New Republic editor Franklin Foer about the new book Insurrections of the Mind, a collection of seminal essays from the magazine's first 100 years.
NPR

Edible Packaging? Retailers Not Quite Ready To Ditch The Wrapper

To reduce waste, some enterprising companies are trying to roll out products that make the package part of the snack — edible packaging. But selling it to the retail market is trickier than it seems.
WAMU 88.5

Senator's Legislation Would Strip NFL Of Nonprofit Status

The Redskins' refusal to change its name has prompted the legislation from U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA).
NPR

The Kaypro II: An Early Computer With A Writer's Heart

Commentator Andrei Codrescu remembers the first word processor he had — the Kaypro II in the 1980s. Its inventor, Andrew Kay, died Aug. 28, at the age of 95.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.