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Virginia Luring Company That Launches Remains Into Space

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NASA's shuttle program is over but, in case you were worried, you can still launch your deceased loved ones into the void of space. 

The program, which is currently run out of New Mexico by a company called Celestis, encourages people to "honor the dream and memory of your departed loved one with a final journey into celestial infinity." 

Celestis sends samples of cremated remains into low earth orbit, deep space or to the moon. They don't launch out of Virginia's spaceport at Wallops Island now, but Virginia's Space Flight Authority would like to change that. 

That's one reason why the state's House of Delegates will consider a bill that would offer a $2,500 tax deduction for Virginians who launch their loved ones out of Virginia. 

"What it does for the Eastern Shore economy is provide another launch opportunity for space workers but in addition it provides opportunities for virginia's lodging and travel industry who will be celebrating their loved one going to fulfill their dream of going into space," says Jack Kennedy, with the Virginia Commercial Space Flight Authority.

The price for the service ranges from $1000 to $13,000, Kennedy thinks it could be available in Virginia within the next two years.

NPR

Lisa Lucas Takes The Reins At The National Book Foundation

Lucas is the third executive director in the history of the foundation, which runs the National Book Awards. Her priority? Inclusivity: "Everyone is either a reader or a potential reader," she says.
NPR

The Shocking Truth About America's Ethanol Law: It Doesn't Matter (For Now)

Ted Cruz doesn't like the law that requires the use of ethanol in gasoline. So what would happen if it was abolished? The surprising answer: not much, probably.
WAMU 88.5

The Latest on the Military, Political and Humanitarian Crises in Syria

Russia continues airstrikes in Syria. Secretary Kerry meets with world leaders in an attempt to resolve the country’s five-year civil war. A panel joins Diane to discuss the latest on the military, political and humanitarian crises facing Syria.

NPR

Twitter Tries A New Kind Of Timeline By Predicting What May Interest You

Twitter has struggled to attract new users. Its latest effort at rejuvenation is a new kind of timeline that predicts which older posts you might not want to miss and displays them on top.

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