WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

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D.C. To Provide Job Training For More Residents

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As part of D.C.'s effort to help the unemployed find work, the city is launching a new campaign to reach out to all city residents who may be looking for jobs without government help. 

It's part of D.C.'s "One City, One Hire" program a campaign encouraging local businesses to hire at least one unemployed resident. 

This week, District officials will launch "phase 2," an aggressive outreach effort aimed at registering out-of-work residents who are right now not in the city's system, and as a result, missing out on training and job opportunities. 

The city will use traditional and social media to get the word out and set up registration drives at libraries and community events. 

So far, hundreds of District residents have found work through One City, One Hire, and several large companies, such as 7-Eleven and Ross Dress For Less have taken up D.C’s offer of pre-screening candidates in order to make the hiring process easier.

The goal in the second phase is to pre-screen all of the people who sign up and match them with open positions. 

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