WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Civics Lesson: 12th-Graders Attend 'Occupy K Street'

Play associated audio

Protesters lock arms to block the street in a confrontation with police during Occupy K Street Dec. 7.
Markette Smith
Protesters lock arms to block the street in a confrontation with police during Occupy K Street Dec. 7.

For some, yesterday's "Occupy K Street" protests were a lesson in civics. Among the crowds demonstrating against corporate greed in D.C. was a high school government class from Maryland. 

Kathy Laughlin, a 12th-grade social studies teacher at the Sandy Spring Friends private school in Olney, Md., brought more than a dozen of her students to march along with her outside corporate lobbying firms on K Street NW Wednesday.

"I think there's a lot to be learned. First of all, for kids this age a lot of them are going to be able to vote, they're 17, 18 years old," Laughlin said as she stood on the sidelines of the protesters locking arms and blocking an intersection at 16th and K streets NW. "So for them to see democracy in action, the ability to go to protest. The right to free speech, the right to assemble. This is all the things they learn about in school."

One of the students, Jason Denaburg, admitted he maybe isn't the biggest supporter of the Occupy movement, but he added that it was interesting to see how many people came out to support it. Although he wasn't locking arms with the protesters, he does see some room for improvement when it comes to the government. 

"I think we spend too much on defense," Denaburg says. "I think defense is important, but a lot of advances can be made in education and other fields."

Not one parent refused to let their child come to the demonstration, Laughlin says.

WAMU 88.5

Colson Whitehead On The Importance Of Historical Fiction In Tumultuous Times

Kojo talks with author Colson Whitehead about his new novel "The Underground Railroad" and its resonance at this particular moment in history.

NPR

'Cup Noodles' Turns 45: A Closer Look At The Revolutionary Ramen Creation

Today instant ramen is consumed in at least 80 countries around the world and even considered popular currency in American prisons.
WAMU 88.5

Rating The United States On Child Care

A majority of parents in the U.S. work outside the home. That means about 12 million children across the country require care. A new report ranks states on cost, quality and availability of child care - and says nobody is getting it right.

NPR

Tech Giants Team Up To Tackle The Ethics Of Artificial Intelligence

Amazon, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and IBM form a group to set the first industrywide best practices for the technology already powering many applications, such as voice and image recognition.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.