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Jack Johnson To Report To Prison Feb. 3

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U.S. Attorney Rod Rosenstein, with his team behind him, discusses the sentence handed down for former Prince George's County Executive Jack Johnson Dec. 6.
U.S. Attorney Rod Rosenstein, with his team behind him, discusses the sentence handed down for former Prince George's County Executive Jack Johnson Dec. 6.

Former Prince George's County Executive Jack Johnson has been ordered to spend more than seven years behind bars after following sentencing on charges of corruption, but he doesn't have to report to prison until Feb. 3.

During sentencing, U.S. District court Judge Peter Messitte agreed that Johnson wouldn't have to report to prison immediately. 

"Defendants can be taken into custody here, or they can surrender voluntarily and the bureau of prisons tells them where they need to report, and then they're required to show up on the appointed day," says U.S. Attorney Rod Rosenstein. "That's typical in white collar crimes where there is no risk of flight."

Johnson could go to the federal Butner penitentiary in North Carolina, joining other notable inmates such as former Adelphia Corporation CEO John Rigas and Bernie Madoff. 

"That where Mr. Johnson wants to go, but the Bureau of Prisons will take into consideration the judge's recommendation but they'll make their own determination where to sent him," Rosenstein says. 

Prosecutors say Johnson collected more than $1 million in bribes and gifts from developers. Johnson's wife, Leslie, is scheduled for sentencing Friday for her role in the corruption scheme. She is facing 12 to 18 months in prison.

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