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USDA Offering Loans To Maryland Farmers

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Maryland farmers faced a growing season with a lot of extreme weather, which had a significant impact on crops. 
Matt Bush
Maryland farmers faced a growing season with a lot of extreme weather, which had a significant impact on crops. 

Extreme weather in the D.C. area this year ranged from excessive heat to torrential rains to drought, which didn't make for the best harvests for farmers. Now, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is offering a helping hand to farmers in Maryland who experienced significant losses due to the weather.

Farmers throughout Maryland suffered marked crop damage between April and October thanks to the hot hot summer and damage from Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee.

Montgomery, Frederick, Prince Georges, Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Howard, Calvert, St. Mary's and Charles Counties are among 15 counties that will benefit from Governor Martin O'Malley's "Federal Crop Disaster Declaration."

The Department of Agriculture says farmers in the disaster designation areas experienced crop loss exceeding 30 percent.

Those affected are eligible for assistance from the USDA Farm Service Agency in the form of emergency loans.

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