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Washington Monument Repairs Planned For Next Week

A view of the damage inside the top of the Washington Monument after the August earthquake. Engineers will rappel down the monument next week to fill cracks that damaged the monument in the quake.
National Park Service
A view of the damage inside the top of the Washington Monument after the August earthquake. Engineers will rappel down the monument next week to fill cracks that damaged the monument in the quake.

 

Engineers who rappelled down the Washington Monument in September to check for earthquake damage are returning to the structure today.

Engineers are setting up ropes and equipment at the top of the monument today, making preparations for a weatherization project that will start next week, according to the National Park Service. That work is expected to last five days. It will cost about $240,000.

The work will be performed by the same team of engineers who dangled from ropes atop the monument in September, inspecting damage caused by the August earthquake.

Workers will be filling in cracks caused by the quake and plugging up gaps left by the loose pieces of marble they removed during the inspection.

 

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